Snowmobile Safety Tips by Darrin B. Laviolette

By Darrin B. Laviolette

Snowmobiles offer an exciting way to enjoy cold, snowy weather, but failure to observe basic safety precautions has the potential to put an abrupt end to your fun. As you enjoy your snowmobile, keep these tips in mind.

Snowmobile Stunt, Attribution: Arthur Mouratidis

1. Heed the Law Most states post detailed laws concerning snowmobiles and rider safety. Before you break out your snowmobile, contact state legislation or visit the state’s online home and search for snowmobile laws. Stay current on changes in the law and make sure you follow all procedures.

2. Dress for the Weather You will perspire while riding your snowmobile, but that does not mean you should shirk warm clothes in favor of lighter, more flexible garb. Before you head out for a ride, pay close attention to local weather forecasts and dress appropriately. When in doubt, wear a layer or two of heavy clothing, a warm jacket, gloves, boots, and an authorized safety helmet.

3. Keep Your Snowmobile in Good Condition During warm seasons, it is easy to forget about your snowmobile. But doing so allows it to fall into a state of disrepair, making it potentially dangerous for you to ride, as well as a threat to others nearby. As snowmobile season approaches, give your machine a thorough inspection or, if you do not know how to perform an inspection, search your area for a qualified mechanic. Much like cars that receive regular tune-ups, your snowmobile will usually function properly if you take time to get it checked out.

4. Ride with Others If possible, venture out on your snowmobile with other riders. Should any of you suffer an injury or encounter an emergency situation, your peers will be able to get help to the injured party. Also, whether you ride alone or with a party, inform someone staying behind where you plan to ride and how long you aim to be away.

5. Think Ahead Even the most well laid plans can go awry. You might injure yourself despite riding safely, or your snowmobile could break down. Pack a first aid kit, cell phone, and other necessary supplies that will allow you to take care of yourself and your ride until help arrives.

6. Know the Terrain Before you go snowmobiling in a new area, research the region online and on foot or in a safe vehicle to learn the lay of the land. Take note of hazards and obstacles such as sudden dips, frozen lakes, and other areas on the terrain that warrant special handling.

7. Know Your Skill Level Do not be fooled into believing that pulling off daring stunts and tricks is simple. Most who perform such maneuvers are trained professionals who have had years of experience and accidents to learn the right way to land their moves. When in doubt, play it safe.

Read more about Darrin B. Laviolette

Mr. Darrin B. LaViolette

February 27, 2010 Leave a comment

A construction manager and project manager with 20 years of experience in the oil and gas sector, Darrin LaViolette embarked on his career following completion of his certificate in Process Piping Drafting (PPD). Currently residing in De Winton, Alberta, Darrin LaViolette continues to seize new opportunities in construction management.

Hello world!

February 27, 2010 1 comment

Welcome to WordPress.com. This is your first post. Edit or delete it and start blogging!

Categories: Uncategorized